PharmacyForward
Getting Started with Collaborative Practice Agreements

Getting Started with Collaborative Practice Agreements

July 13, 2021

Charmaine Rochester-Eyeguokan, PharmD, BCACP, CDCES - University of Maryland School of Pharmacy - and Jeffrey Tingen, PharmD, MBA, BCPS, BCACP, CDCES - VCU Health, Department of Family Medicine & Population Health - talk to use about the ins and outs of collaborative practice agreements.

Key Lessons

  • Collaborative practice is governed by state law and regulations; it is important to be familiar with the specific rules for constructing collaborative practice agreements (CPA) in your state.
  • Many states require pharmacists to have specific training and experience in order to enter into a CPA - but some states have relatively few requirements or none at all.
  • CPAs are useful tools to enable greater efficiency by granting the pharmacist greater autonomy to carry out certain patient care functions; however, a CPA is not required to perform many functions that are ordinarily a part of a pharmacist's scope of practice.
  • It's important to have a significant level of rapport and trust with your providers crafting a CPA together.
  • While CPAs are fairly common in ambulatory clinics, they are a potentially useful tool in community pharmacy practice, long-term care facilities, and specialty pharmacy practice.

To learn more about collaborative practice and CPA, check out the Collaborative Practice Resource Page on the iForumRx.org website.

Pharmacists and Population Health

Pharmacists and Population Health

February 18, 2021

Amanda Schartel, PharmD, BCACP - Clinical Pharmacy Specialist with ChristianaCare CareVio - talks with us about the roles and responsibilities of a population health pharmacist.

Key Lessons:

  • Population health involves holistically evaluating the health needs of a population and bringing together the resources and expertise needed to address those needs.
  • Population health teams often include practitioners that many patients in primary care settings don't ordinarily have access including social workers, respiratory therapists, and clinical pharmacists.
  • Sophisticated data analytics and remote monitoring tools help population health practitioners proactively identify patients who may need additional services or whose health status may be changing.
  • Patient encounters are often conducting using videoconferencing technology and text-messaging can quickly capture patient experience data. 
  • The role and responsibilities of the population health pharmacist often extend beyond what an ambulatory care pharmacist might address.
  • Population health pharmacists often have the authority to adjust medication regimens and order laboratory tests.
  • Residency training and board certification are not required but preferred for those seeking employment as a population health pharmacist. 
  • The key skill sets needed by a population health pharmacist include patient management experience addressing complex medication-related issues as well as a deep knowledge of quality metrics and value-based payment structures.
Credentialing & Privileging (III)

Credentialing & Privileging (III)

May 15, 2019

Brandon Shank, PharmD, BCOP - Clinical Pharmacy Specialist at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center - talks to us about credentialing & privileging from a front-line clinician's point of view.

Key Lessons:

  • Building rapport and trust with your team is an essential first step from which clinical privileges follow.
  • State laws vary.  Some authorize privileging of pharmacists at the institutional level.
  • Obtaining and maintaining clinical privileges requires additional training ... and paperwork.
  • Pharmacists have a unique understanding of the dosing and available dosage forms of drugs - this brings value to the patient care team.
  • Privileging pharmacists to take on advanced clinical responsibilities can increase team efficiency and effectiveness.

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Credentialing & Privileging (II)

Credentialing & Privileging (II)

April 16, 2019

Julie Groppi, PharmD - National Program Manager, Clinical Pharmacy Practice Policy and Standards, Department of Veteran's Affairs and Todd Nesbit, PharmD, MBA - Director of Pharmacy Patient Care Services, the Johns Hopkins Hospital - discuss the credentialing and privileging of pharmacists.

Key Lessons

  • Credentialing is the process of verifying someone education, training, certifications, and experience. 
  • Privileging is the process of determining an appropriate scope of practice based on the practitioner's credentials and granting authority to carry out specific patient care services/decisions.
  • All health systems should credential the pharmacists they employ.
  • Pharmacists can be privileged to initiate, modify, continue, or discontinue medication therapies as well as order tests and referrals as needed to achieve treatment goals.
  • A pharmacist's privileges may be restricted to specific drugs and disease (e.g. collaboratory drug therapy management agreement) or may be service-specific (e.g. all patients enrolled in or assigned to a specific clinical service unit).
  • The credentials necessary to be privileged to carry out advanced patient care services typically include residency training and board certification.

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Credentialing & Privileging (I)

Credentialing & Privileging (I)

March 13, 2019

Joseph Saseen, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCACP, CLS - Professor of Clinical Pharmacy and Family Medicine, University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences - discusses the various credentials pharmacists can earn following graduation and licensure.

Key Lessons

  • Credentials include degrees, licensure, post-graduate training, and board certification.
  • Earning a certificate is not synonymous with becoming board certified.
  • Board certification requires candidates to meet specific eligibility criteria and pass a comprehensive examination to validate the breadth and depth of knowledge in the area of specialization.
  • Board certification can give pharmacists a competitive advantage for employment and open doors to new opportunities.
  • Candidates should consider preparing for a board certification exam either through a formal, structured program or forming a study group ... or both.
  • Obtaining advanced credentials is ultimately about improving the quality of care pharmacists provide to patients.

View and Download the Show Notes!

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